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C
hristian healing is one of my favorite topics and one of my least favorite. When I see a book under the  Christian category with the subject matter of healing, I become hesitant. Will this book I’m picking up tell me I will be guaranteed healing if I do x,y,z? Or will this book dismantle any factor of healing because from that author is coming from the lens that it just doesn’t exist?

I saw the name Joni Eareckson Tada on this book as a contributor in this book, giving the forward, so I knew either extremism would most likely not be a factor. In fact, Sala addresses the extremism from both camps quickly in What You Need to Know About Healing, providing a biblical basis for believing miraculous healing still occurs while maintaining a grounded perspective by showing biblically that healing does not always occur in every individual and is not akin to salvation as some have claimed.

Sala makes it clear that health is not simply relegated to just the spiritual or just the physical. It’s easy to hyper focus on one area while missing healing in the others. What a breath of fresh air is was to read this quote on the matter:
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A Rewind in Time:

Healing from the Old Testament accounts are fit into a chapter of its own. Though not a complete listing of OT healing accounts-  I don’t think Sala meant for them to be. The New Testament Accounts are also studied in a chapter of its own. Questions arise- Why did Jesus heal? Why do the Gospels focus on Christ healing certain conditions over others? The interesting topic also arises- why did miracles dwindle after the rise of the institutionalized church dating back to Constantine? I thought more could be fleshed out on this latter question mentioned (especially since it’s such a major one with various input).

Sala wisely provides accounts of healing by trustworthy church fathers- all documented after the close of the canon. This is an important factor since there are some who say miracles were not active after the Bible was completed. 

 

Sala fast-forwards to modern times to address the types of healings of today:

 

*The instantaneous healings- providing stories, most of which have been researched via medical documentation by Sala himself

*Integrative Healing- Showing how Jesus was never against physicians and how doctors and medicine can be agents infused by God for healing

*Redemptive Healing- touches on the accounts of individuals who may not have been healed physically, but God used their stories of His inward transformation in their lives for His glory (some familiar names in this chapter pop up such as Amy Carmichael, Corrie Ten Boom, and Joni Eareckson Tada. 

A favorite quote of mine from the end of Sala's book

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Safe, Balanced, & Biblically Based:

Sala finishes the book with what to do when we need healing which came from a biblically based perspective. It’s difficult to find safe, balanced, and biblical books on healing, but this would be one to fit all categories. There may have been some points I disagreed with Sala on, but the issues were minute compared with others I’ve read in the same category. I would recommend this to any person of faith struggling with their health, church leaders needing a further grasp on the ministry of healing (there’s a section in the back specifically for you guys :) ) and to individuals who have loved ones facing illness. 

 

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In a nutshell, this a perfect book for a balanced and biblical understanding on healing. Some interesting historical factoids are included that you probably wouldn’t know about otherwise. Did you know that Charles Spurgeon had moments of debilitating depression? Other great information is packed into this book for the sick, someone who loves the sick, or someone ministering to the sick.

 

I received this book for free from B&H Academic and the opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”